Powerful message from the Bunnings worker after leaving college

0

A Bunnings employee has revealed how she defied society’s expectations and dropped out of college after realizing she had already landed her dream job.

Maddison Kramer, 22, had almost completed a high school diploma at the University of Notre Dame in Perth when she lost interest in continuing to teach.

Despite a HECS debt of $ 20,000, Ms. Kramer decided to withdraw from her course and pursue her career with the computer hardware giant where she had worked since she was a teenager, realizing that it was her true passion.

The retail employee shared her inspiring career path in a viral post on LinkedIn, alongside a photo of her wearing the company’s signature red and green uniform.

“In this photo, it took me $ 20,000 in HECS debt and two universities for me to learn that my degree was not worth what I thought it was,” the message begins.

Maddison Kramer (pictured) spent years studying at college before realizing her part-time job at Bunnings was her real passion This photo, shared on his LinkedIn, shows him smiling after making the decision to pursue his career with the computer hardware giant

‘[It took] five years trying to figure out what career is right for me. So that I finally understand that I don’t have to go to college to be successful. Now have a transcript of “withdrawn” in my 2nd final year of study to go there.

“This photo shows the smile on my face that I made the right choice.”

Ms. Kramer said that while $ 20,000 might “seem like a lot of money,” she has no regrets as she has accumulated valuable life experiences during her time studying.

‘It was the best $ 20,000 I have [have] spent, she said.

“I have met a great diversity of friends throughout my life. I found my strengths and weaknesses. I stood in front of many classrooms filled with schoolchildren.

“I helped develop the individual strengths of young people, I helped them to develop and, most importantly, I shaped the next generation.

“It was a small price to pay for me to learn that when you start taking care of yourself first, everything else becomes a lot easier.”

Ms Kramer, who was completing a bachelor’s degree in health and physical education, said she lost interest in teaching after attending her penultimate internship at a public school.

At this point, she realized that she loved her job at Bunnings “more than being in a classroom”.

Ms Kramer (pictured) said she didn't regret racking up $ 20,000 in college fees because she had valuable experiences while studying

Ms Kramer (pictured) said she didn’t regret racking up $ 20,000 in college fees because she had valuable experiences while studying

Visits to the Bunnings warehouse exploded during the Covid-19 pandemic, as trapped Australians used the extra time at home to complete do-it-yourself projects.

Visits to the Bunnings warehouse exploded during the Covid-19 pandemic, as trapped Australians used the extra time at home to complete do-it-yourself projects.

“From that point on, I dropped out of college and moved on to a full-time position where I fell in love with continuing my career in retail,” she said.

“Having worked in the company for seven years now, I have seized every opportunity to learn something new with each shift, to explore what I am capable of, to develop and explore my abilities to the next step. “

Ms Kramer said she was grateful for the path she had taken, even though she had come full circle.

“I’m thankful for my failures because if I don’t fail, I probably don’t learn,” she said.

“And if I don’t learn, I don’t grow. “

The post quickly garnered over 4,500 likes, many of which praised the young Western Australian for her inspiring post.

‘A refreshing and positive Maddie post. Thank you, ”said one person.

“Well said and well done,” wrote another.

A customer pulls goods out of her cart after a brief visit to a Bunnings warehouse in Sydney in August

A customer pulls goods out of her cart after a brief visit to a Bunnings warehouse in Sydney in August

A couple rolling half a dozen barbecue coals and a carpet from the warehouse hypermarket

A couple rolling half a dozen barbecue coals and a carpet from the warehouse hypermarket

“My son has had the opportunity to work at Bunnings since he was 16 years old. The skills he learned on this trip were invaluable and will help him on his journey through life. “

One woman said her 20-year-old son made the same decision to throw in the towel on his degree after accumulating $ 10,000 in debt.

“He has been with Bunnings for 5 years and after calling to leave Uni in 2021 it has become a part-time position,” she said.

“He blew me away the other week when he said in 6 months he wanted to step up and lead (a team). So I’m super excited to see where his Bunnings journey takes him.

Another former Bunnings employee added that he learned life-saving skills during his time with the company.

“My first job was at Bunnings, also sharing the energy and joy of what he taught me, the fundamentals in niche areas of the construction industry,” he said.

Former Bunnings employees commented on Ms Kramer's post to positively reflect the time they spent with the hardware chain.  Pictured: A Sydney shopper clicks and picks up a new jar of veg in August

Former Bunnings employees commented on Ms Kramer’s post to positively reflect the time they spent with the hardware chain. Pictured: A Sydney shopper clicks and picks up a new jar of veg in August

In a statement, Bunnings chief executive Mike Schneider said the company really strives to give his team opportunities to ground and grow in their careers.

“We want our team members and future team members to see retail as a career path, not just a part-time job while they study and we really strive to provide an environment with a wide range of meaningful career development options for all team members, ”said Mr. Schneider.

“We are really proud to have Maddison on the team.”

Share.

Comments are closed.